Slow travel

Lets join the Slow travel movement when possible:

“In the same way that the Slow Food revolution has created a compelling antithesis to the burgeoning Fast Food business, Slow Travel encourages people to resist “Fast” Travel – the frustratingly frequent habit of speeding through all the best known landmarks of a city in 24 or 48 hours – then leaving again…..Slow Travel encourages us to slacken our pace, re-consider our motivations (and itineraries) and embrace a “less is more” instead of a “fast is better” ethos. It emboldens us to take pause. To think. To saunter instead of rush and enjoy the details instead of blurring past them.”

Slow Travel Berlin was founded in January 2010 by British guidebook author, travel journalist and photographer Paul Sullivan. The aim is to establish a repository of eclectic information about the city from a range of perspectives to encourage deeper, more varied exploration and promotion of small, locally-minded businesses and services.

Despite its reputation as a party town and bohemian node, Berlin has many inherent Slow characteristics. It has fewer people and less industry than most capital cities, which means it has less traffic and less stress. It’s huge, with plenty outside the well-trodden center to explore, and is officially one of the greenest cities in Europe. Of course it’s part of the global “rat race”. But its turbulent and fascinating history are unique in Europe and its creative and cultural life seem stronger, or at least more visible, than in other major cities of its kind.

Slowtravel Stockholm

Slow Travel Stockholm is a spin off of Slow Travel Berlin which was founded in January 2010 by British guidebook author, travel journalist and photographer Paul Sullivan. Slow Travel Stockholm is run and managed by award-winning travel writer and photographer Lola Akinmade Åkerström.

The aim is to establish a repository of eclectic information about the city from a range of perspectives to encourage deeper, more varied exploration and promotion of small, locally-minded businesses and services.

Despite its reputation as being an overpriced city perfect for people-watching and a bastion for all things design, Stockholm has many inherent Slow characteristics. It has less people and less industry than most capital cities, which means it has less traffic and less stress. It’s huge, with plenty outside the well-trodden center to explore, and is officially one of the greenest cities in Europe, winning the inaugural Green Capital of Europe award. Of course it’s part of the global “rat race”. But its fascinating culture and open lifestyle are unique in Europe and its creative and cultural life seem stronger, or at least more visible, than in other major cities of its kind. Read more at Slow Travel Stockholm.

 

A Manifesto for Slow Travel

“Over the last few hundred years there has been a subtle shift in how we think about travel. Dante’s journey through the three realms of the dead can be read as an intriguing piece of travel writing. Homer’s Odyssey is an equally fabulous travel narrative. Yet travel has somehow slipped out of fashion. True, we fly hither and thither, but travel is rarely valued for its own sake. Instead it is recast as a minor inconvenience that somehow intervenes between our point of departure and our intended destination. The pleasure of the journey is eclipsed by anticipation of arrival. To get there fast is better than to travel slow.”

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